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Reverend Derek Terry grew up in a church that had been part of his family for five generations, but left several years after being ordained as a minister. As a gay man, he wanted to find a place where he could be himself in front of God and his congregation. He found that in an old church in…

Friday, June 22, 2018

Trans bodybuilding provides a unique look at the trans community. FTM Fitness World is an organization that hosts the only transgender bodybuilding competition in the world. There are usually around 10 competitors, both pre-op and post-op, who participate. It's a safe space where participant…

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Around five years ago, Corey Maison first came out to her mom as transgender. A few years later, her mom Eric came out as transgender, too. The transition hasn't been easy, but now that the Maisons are living as their authentic selves, the two say it's family that has kept them strong.

Joey LeMar, better known as Deadlee, is a walking contradiction. On stage, he’s a brash, outspoken cholo rapper with a tendency for angry expression; off-stage, he’s a sensitive, smiling husband to his partner of almost 10 years, José. LeMar straddles the line of two seemingly contradictory …

For thousands of years, the people of Hungary have soaked in the rich, thermal waters that lie below the country’s surface. From Roman emperors to Turkish kings, Budapest’s baths have been attracting the bright and the bold to the city since the 2nd century. Today, bathhouses continue to dom…

Unknown to many, Bayard Rustin was the heart and soul of the civil rights movement in the United States. As Martin Luther King Jr.’s chief organizer, he helped translate the philosophy of nonviolence into direct action by organizing the 1963 March on Washington. So why isn’t he more famous? …

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

The type of sushi you’re probably most familiar with is haya-nare, a quick form of sushi made and consumed within a day using vinegared rice and raw fish. But there’s a second type of sushi that takes a little longer to prepare—try three years longer. Served with rice and fermented fish, fun…

In the end, the decision seemed inevitable. After a seven-day trial in Kansas City federal court in March, in which Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach needed to be tutored on basic trial procedure by the judge and was found in contempt for his “willful failure” to obey a ruling, even he knew his chances were slim. Kobach told The Kansas City Star at the time that he expected the judge would rule against him (though he expressed optimism in his chances on appeal).

President Donald Trump’s zero tolerance policy is creating a zombie army of children forcibly injected with medications that make them dizzy, listless, obese and even incapacitated, according to legal filings that show immigrant children in U.S. custody subdued with powerful psychiatric drugs.

Cassandro El Exotico, a Mexican wrestler, owns a championship belt. But the biggest difference between this lucha libre wrestler and his opponents is his garb. In a sport of rampant machismo, Cassandro stands apart. With an outfit that mixes masculine and feminine styles, and a fierce determ…

The beach is meant to be fun, light and enjoyable. But for some, the beach is an uncomfortable place, where gender norms and body image stereotypes create pressure to look or dress a certain way. That's why YouTube personality Ari Fitz created Tomboyish (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXQG…

Bronx-born Sara Kana is a child of hip-hop and the mother of Prism Battle League. First launched in 2016, Prism is a platform for emcees in the LGBTQ community to compete in a battle of words, wise and wit. Painfully familiar with homophobia in and beyond hip-hop, Sara hopes for Prism to be …

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

The Nebraska Corn Board and the Nebraska Corn Growers Association have expressed their opposition to President Donald Trump's plans to increase trade tariffs on China, warning that "a trade war with China will deeply impact U.S. farmers, U.S. workers and U.S. consumers."

Dez Marshall is a barber at The Gamesman barbershop in Brooklyn, which has been serving the neighborhood for the last 50 years. Dez's clientele is mostly the LGBTQ community, and she provides a space for people who might otherwise not have a safe place to go. Plus, she's giving fresh cuts al…

Vajdahunyad Castle isn’t just a castle. It’s an architectural homage to 21 different buildings, among them a church and a castle with ties to the Dracula myth. The castle was designed to celebrate the Hungarian State’s 1,000th birthday, built using wood planks and flimsy cardboard. As public…

Baltimore is home to a robust ball culture (think big dance competitions). The balls have also become a home for HIV outreach, and at the center of it all is Keith Holt, a performer who also works for the Baltimore health department. He has expanded the organization's HIV education and outre…

Leer en Español.The desperate sobbing of 10 Central American children, separated from their parents one day last week by immigration authorities at the border, makes for excruciating listening. Many of them sound like they’re crying so hard, they can barely breathe. They scream “Mami” and “Papá” over and over again, as if those are the only words they know.The baritone voice of a Border Patrol agent booms above the crying. “Well, we have an orchestra here,” he jokes. “What’s missing is a conductor.”Then a distraught but determined 6-year-old Salvadoran girl pleads repeatedly for someone to call her aunt. Just one call, she begs anyone who will listen. She says she’s memorized the phone number, and at one point, rattles it off to a consular representative. “My mommy says that I’ll go with my aunt,” she whimpers, “and that she’ll come to pick me up there as quickly as possible.”An audio recording obtained by ProPublica adds real-life sounds of suffering to a contentious policy debate that has so far been short on input from those with the most at stake: immigrant children. More than 2,300 of them have been separated from their parents since April, when the Trump administration launched its “zero tolerance” immigration policy, which calls for prosecuting all people who attempt to illegally enter the country and taking away the children they brought with them. More than 100 of those children are under the age of 4. The children are initially held in warehouses, tents or big box stores that have been converted into Border Patrol detention facilities.Condemnations of the policy have been swift and sharp, including from some of the administration’s most reliable supporters. It has united religious conservatives and immigrant rights activists, who have said that “zero tolerance” amounts to “zero humanity.” Democratic and Republican members of Congress spoke out against the administration’s enforcement efforts over the weekend. Former first lady Laura Bush called the administration’s practices “cruel” and “immoral,” and likened images of immigrant children being held in kennels to those that came out of Japanese internment camps during World War II. And the American Academy of Pediatrics has said the practice of separating children from their parents can cause the children “irreparable harm.”Still, the administration had stood by it. President Donald Trump blames Democrats and says his administration is only enforcing laws already on the books, although that’s not true. There are no laws that require children to be separated from their parents, or that call for criminal prosecutions of all undocumented border crossers. Those practices were established by the Trump administration.Attorney General Jeff Sessions has cited passages from the Bible in an attempt to establish religious justification. On Monday, he defended it again saying it was a matter of rule of law, “We cannot and will not encourage people to bring children by giving them blanket immunity from our laws.” A Border Patrol spokesman echoed that thought in a written statement.In recent days, authorities on the border have begun allowing tightly controlled tours of the facilities that are meant to put a humane face on the policy. But cameras are heavily restricted. And the children being held are not allowed to speak to journalists.The audio obtained by ProPublica breaks that silence. It was recorded last week inside a U.S. Customs and Border Protection detention facility. The person who made the recording asked not to be identified for fear of retaliation. That person gave the audio to Jennifer Harbury, a well-known civil rights attorney who has lived and worked for four decades in the Rio Grande Valley along the Texas border with Mexico. Harbury provided it to ProPublica. She said the person who recorded it was a client who “heard the children’s weeping and crying, and was devastated by it.”The person estimated that the children on the recording are between 4 and 10 years old. It appeared that they had been at the detention center for less than 24 hours, so their distress at having been separated from their parents was still raw. Consulate officials tried to comfort them with snacks and toys. But the children were inconsolable.The child who stood out the most was the 6-year-old Salvadoran girl with a phone number stuck in her head. At the end of the audio, a consular official offers to call the girl’s aunt. ProPublica dialed the number she recited in the audio, and spoke with the aunt about the call.“It was the hardest moment in my life,” she said. “Imagine getting a call from your 6-year-old niece. She’s crying and begging me to go get her. She says, ‘I promise I’ll behave, but please get me out of here. I’m all alone.’”The aunt said what made the call even more painful was that there was nothing she could do. She and her 9-year-old daughter are seeking asylum in the United States after immigrating here two years ago for the exact same reasons and on the exact same route as her sister and her niece. They are from a small town called Armenia, about an hour’s drive northwest of the Salvadoran capital, but well within reach of its crippling crime waves. She said gangs were everywhere in El Salvador: “They’re on the buses. They’re in the banks. They’re in schools. They’re in the police. There’s nowhere for normal people to feel safe.”She said her niece and sister set out for the United States over a month ago. They paid a smuggler $7,000 to guide them through Guatemala, and Mexico and across the border into the United States. Now, she said, all the risk and investment seem lost.The aunt said she worried that any attempt to intervene in her niece’s situation would put hers and her daughter’s asylum case at risk, particularly since the Trump administration overturned asylum protections for victims of gang and domestic violence. She said she’s managed to speak to her sister, who has been moved to an immigration detention facility near Port Isabel, Texas. And she keeps in touch with her niece, Alison Jimena Valencia Madrid, by telephone. Mother and daughter, however, have not been able to speak to one another.The aunt said that Alison has been moved out of the Border Patrol facility to a shelter where she has a real bed. But she said that authorities at the shelter have warned the girl that her mother, 29-year-old Cindy Madrid, might be deported without her.“I know she’s not an American citizen,” the aunt said of her niece. “But she’s a human being. She’s a child. How can they treat her this way?”Filed under:ImmigrationThe Trump Administration

In Tehuantepec, a town in the Mexican state of Oaxaca, Lukas Avendaño and fellow muxes live beyond the gender binary. A muxe is an individual assigned male at birth who behaves outside roles traditionally associated with masculinity. Sometimes referred to as a third gender, muxe identity pre…

Monday, June 18, 2018

Grab a front row seat to six musical performances you might otherwise miss—from a homegrown Harlem jazz concert to the classic stylings of Japan’s first Black Enka singer.

Subhi Nahas has tread a difficult path to asylum. Outed as a gay man in his native Syria, Nahas was forced to leave his family and friends behind in 2012. Now as an LGBT activist who works with the Organization for Refuge, Asylum & Migration, Nahas pulls from his own experiences to help …

Earth had three of a kind in hand last month: It was the fourth warmest May, the fourth warmest March–May period and the fourth warmest year to date on record for the globe, NOAA reported Monday.

Rain Dove walks the runway gender bending in both menswear and womenswear. However, the activist/model cares less about clothes and more about redefining the notion of "him" and "her."

Astronaut Peggy Whitson, the first female commander of the International Space Station and the record holder for most time in space by an American, has retired from NASA.  Her last day was Friday.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Ready for another adventure. Travel with us to Kenya where we meet explorers, innovators and trailblazers building the future. We meet a dream team saving Kenya's wild animals, sing along with a country music star and meet a mother passing on her strength to her daughter.

Thursday, June 14, 2018