yesteryear

100 YEARS AGO

Sept. 5, 1919

The Baptists of the state are undertaking to raise seventy five million dollars for missions and general denominational work. This stupendous sum is all to be subscribed by Dec. 7, and to be paid during the next five years. Arkansas’ quota is $3,200,000. Sevier County is asked to raise $15,000. On our rally day last Sunday we gave the matter primary consideration. We are confident of victory. It is a great forward movement, one in which every loyal Baptist will be glad to aid. 

--

The old original city calaboose has been sold to Albert Reese who is demolishing it and salvaging the lumber, thereby acquiring, at present market prices, about a million dollars worth of two by sixes, of which the walls were constructed. This lumber has been seasoning for twenty-two years and is warranted not to shrink or crack. This bastile was constructed in the early days of the town when Dicus was city marshal and when “Hurrah City” was running at full blast. None of the unfortunates, who in years gone by were incarcerated in its walls, so far as we know, have gained any distinction in crime, and we must therefore conclude that the narrow precincts of its dimensions, the ill ventilation of its construction and the unsanitary arrangement of the architecture must have had a reformatory effect on its inmates. We are sure that one August day or night in the old calaboose would make a law abiding citizen of any but a confirmed criminal. 

--

Dr. David A. Maxwell of Lockesburg is in receipt of a letter from Surgeon General W. C. Braisted of the U.S. Navy notifying him that the Croix De Guerre has been awarded by the French Government to his son, David M. Maxwell, who was killed in action in the fierce fighting at Belleu Wood, June 17, 1918. David M. Maxwell met his death while attempting to rescue a wounded soldier who had fallen out over the front lines. The soldier was later brought in and recovered but Maxwell did not survive his wound. 

--

75 YEARS AGO

September 7, 1944

An urgent appeal was issued this week by Mrs. O. B. Tate, chairman of the Red Cross surgical dressings project, for more women to help make the October-November quota of dressings, material for which has just arrived. The previous quota of 27,000 4x4 sponges has just been completed by the De Queen and Horatio workers, Mrs. Tate said. Work hours at the local project workroom at the Elk hotel are one to five p.m. each Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. “We are greatly in need of more volunteer workers for this important war job,” Mrs. Tate said, “and we would like to have as many women as possible for the work period each afternoon, Tuesday through Friday. The dressings are vitally needed on the battlefields and the men doing the fighting are depending on us to keep them coming.”

--

An X-ray unit from the Arkansas State Board of Health will be in Sevier County September 14 and 15. On September 14 the machine will be in De Queen at the court house from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. On September 15 it will be Lockesburg at the Methodist Church with the same hours. Those interested are urged to get permission from their family physician and please register at the County Health Office for completion of records. 

--

K. Lee Williams, maestro of the theatre circuit with headquarters in De Queen, is laid up in De Queen General Hospital with a serious back injury suffered when he was thrown from a horse at his farm near Little River Country Club recently. His injury is very similar to that suffered by John Glasgow under like conditions more than a year ago, and he will be confined to his bed for several weeks. 

--

Two Mount Vernon boys were ordered to work for the park when they were found guilty of breaking an ordinance against throwing missiles in the park. The police magistrate warned them that the throwing of pop bottles must stop, not only because of danger to persons on the ground, but also because of a scarcity of pop bottles. 

--

50 YEARS AGO

September 4, 1969

A trio of bank robbers balked at admitting armed robbery at Dierks here Wednesday, Aug. 27. The three federal prisoners brought down from Leavenworth, Kansas stood before Circuit Judge Bobby Steel at 3 p.m. and pleaded not guilty to armed robbery of the teller’s window at Dierks on Jun 16, 1967. Their action discomfited local officers who had hoped to put away the case as one solved. Prisoners charged included Doyce McCary, 35, of Wright City, Oklahoma, James G. Grooms, 28, of Masseille, Illinois and W.C. Edwards, 38, of Garden City, Michigan. All three are now serving terms in the Leavenworth penitentiary for bank robbery. 

--

Cossatot E.H.C. became a three-time sweepstakes winner Tuesday when judges tabbed its educational booth at the annual county fair as superior to all other entries. With a theme “A New Outlook for the Blind,” the club scored a maximum 100 points. The display will be shown at the Four-States Fair in Texarkana later in the fall. 

--

De Queen’s football coaches made their annual pre-season report to members of De Queen Rotary Club Friday noon. Coach Wayne Freppon told of the new alignment in district 7-A because of consolidations and enrollment increases. District members now include De Queen, Nashville, Ashdown, Gurdon, Prescott and Foreman. 

--

Jeff Pride Jr., Texarkana, won the championship flight of the annual Little River club golf tournament Monday on the third hole of a sudden death playoff after he and Raymond Garcia ended the regulation 54 holes of medal play with identical 237’s. 

--

25 YEARS AGO

September 8, 1994

Cindy Bingham of De Queen is finding success in regional quarter horse show events, including an award from the American Quarter Horse Association. This summer Mrs. Bingham won 10 first place awards and four second places in a two-day show by the Arkansas chapter of the American Quarter Horse Association at Pine Bluff. Shealso competed in the Western Arkansas Association show at Fort Smith where she took first place in all five events at the show. Her home and a tack room in the barn contain over 300 trophies won in competitive riding events. But an award she considers most important is the Amateur All-Around award she has been granted by the American Quarter Horse Association. 

--

Unemployment in Sevier County dipped to 4.5 percent during July, according to the latest labor Market Information Report from the Employment Security Division. The jobless rate was 4.7 percent in June and 5.5 percent in July 1993. 

--

A 13-year-old boy who pleaded guilty to a manslaughter charge in the slaying of another 13-year-old in a dispute over a wallet was sentenced to state custody until he turns 18. Little River County Deputy Prosecutor Tom Cooper said the judge ordered the boy sent to a boot-camp-style school, the “most serious place you can send a juvenile offender.”

--

The Horatio City Council selected Hawkins and Associates of Texarkana as the engineer to design the town’s new city hall building. Steve Buford, a resident of Horatio and a Texas-licensed architect, has been assisting the city council with the building project. The council has agreed to sell the present city hall building to the Horatio State Bank. The city hall is supposed to be relocated by Jan. 1, 1995. 

--

The Cossatot Technical College Foundation Committee wrapped up its 21st Century Fund drive Friday with enough donations to exceed its two-year $500,000 goal by $3,000. Chairman Jay Bunyard announced that the committee has raised a grand total of $503,639.40. “We’re still waiting to hear from applications to some foundations and corporations, so we may get more contributions later this year,” Bunyard said. 

--

10 YEARS AGO

September 3, 2009

The Sevier County Fair and Rodeo experienced a fantastic crowd this year. Thousands of residents from Sevier and surrounding counties came out to enjoy the fair’s rides and games as well as nightly professional rodeo. 

--

Veterans and active-duty military personnel that are looking for guidance on which school s are doing the most to embrace them as students need look no further than Cossatot Community College of the University of Arkansas. A publication called “G.I. Jobs” has published a list of military friendly schools’, the top 15 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools which are doing the most to embrace America’s veterans as students. Schools on the list range from state universities and private colleges to community colleges and trade schools. The common bond is their shared priority of recruiting students with military experience. CCUA offers a 50 percent discount on tuition to veterans, active duty military as well as members of their immediate families. Criteria for making the Military Friendly Schools list included efforts to recruit and retain military and veteran students, results in recruiting military and veteran students and academic accreditations. 

--

Amanda Woodman from Court Appointed Special Advocates, CASA, spoke to the De Queen Chapter of Rotary on Monday about her program. She is located in Texarkana and has volunteers in 12 counties covering Southwest Arkansas and Texas. The program is to help youth that have been abused or neglected and provide information to the judge assigned the case to help to determine the location where the youth need to be placed. 

--

One of Robert Helm’s Jr. horses, posed for a picture after receiving the title of American quarter Horse Association Reserve World Champion.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.